Wednesday, August 26, 2015

How Much Does Sugar Contribute to Obesity?

Last week, the British Medical Journal published a review article titled "Dietary Sugars and Body Weight", concluding that "free sugars" and sugar-sweetened beverages contribute to weight gain.  But what are "free sugars", and why does the scientific literature suggest that the relationship between sugar intake and body weight isn't as straightforward as it may initially appear?

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

More Thoughts on the Recent Low-fat vs. Low-carb Metabolic Ward Study

The recent low-carb vs. low-fat study has provoked criticism from parts of the diet-health community.  Let's examine these objections and see how they hold up to scientific scrutiny.

Thursday, August 13, 2015

A New Human Trial Undermines the Carbohydrate-insulin Hypothesis of Obesity, Again

The carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis of obesity states that carbohydrates (particularly refined carbohydrates and sugar) are the primary cause of obesity due to their ability to increase circulating insulin, and that the solution to obesity is to restrict carbohydrate intake.  Numerous studies have tested this hypothesis, more or less directly, in animals and humans.  Despite the fact that many of these studies undermine the hypothesis, it remains extremely popular, both in the popular media and to a lesser extent among researchers.  A new human trial by Kevin Hall's research team at the US National Institutes of Health offers very strong evidence that the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis of obesity is incorrect.  At the same time, it offers surprising and provocative results that challenge prevailing ideas about diet and weight loss.